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SHRM Volunteer Organizational Structure
 

    

Volunteer Leader Organization Chart

Through the volunteer leadership structure, SHRM members are linked with the Board of Directors, the policy-making body of the Society.

Board of Directors

The Society operates with a volunteer Board of Directors elected by the Society's membership. The Board is comprised of a chair, chair designate, secretary, treasurer, directors-at-large, and the president and CEO of SHRM. To learn more about SHRM's current Board of Directors, go to /board.

SHRM Staff

The staff at SHRM are available to assist you with any of your chapter issues. You can reach SHRM by calling (800) 283-SHRM or (703) 535-6490. The TDD number is (703) 548-6999. You may also contact them via the Contact Us Request Form.

SHRM Volunteer Panels

The 6 Special Expertise Panels of the Society for Human Resource Management are an integral part of the organization’s operation. Each panel is made up of SHRM members – senior HR professionals who deal with issues that impact the HR profession on a daily basis.

Through membership on one of the panels, members identify emerging trends in specific topic areas, provide expert advice on matters of professional significance, and provide guidance on matters of public policy. Benefits of participation include creating opportunities to: contribute to the HR profession, share ideas and information in a professional forum with other HR professionals on matters of importance in the field of HR, expand your professional network through interactions with panel members on all 6 panels, and stay on the cutting edge of your field through access to early information on emerging trends and issues.

For information about the missions of the 6 panels see below:

Ethics/Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on ethics as it relates to the realm of HR and business decision-making and behavior that draws more on personal and organizational values rather than on specific legal requirements, and how these behaviors affect the organization. Also  expertise on all aspects of corporate social responsibility as it relates to the human resource profession and improving the quality of life of the workforce, their families, and the local community at large.


Global Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on all aspects of HR within the global context - either as a U.S.-based entity dealing with expatriates or as a non-U.S. based entity operating locally or worldwide.

HR Disciplines Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on all aspects of HR's functional areas including: Employee Health, Safety & Security, Employee Relations, Organizational Development, Total Rewards, and Staffing Management.

Labor Relations Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on all aspects of HR as it relates to the traditional elements of formal labor-management relations and how to effectively manage these elements.


Technology & HR Management Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on the use of technology of all types and in all functional areas of human resources in support of human resource and business goals.


Workplace Diversity Panel

To serve the professional and advance the profession by providing, for the human resource profession and the SHRM membership via the SHRM staff, current and emerging practices, advice, and expertise on all aspects of HR as it relates to workplace diversity in the workplace including all of the qualities, experiences, and work styles that make individual’s unique, as well as how organizations can maximize these qualities in support of business aims.

For more information, contact Laurie McIntosh, SPHR at laurie.mcintosh@shrm.org  or Robert LaGow at robert.lagow@shrm.org.


Membership Advisory Council (MAC)

The MAC serves as an interface between the volunteer leaders and the SHRM Board of Directors. The MAC is composed of one elected representative from each of the Regional Councils. The MAC provides input from the membership through the regional councils to the board and feedback from the board to the membership, back through the regional councils; and provides operational input to SHRM to ensure optimum service/support to and from the volunteer leadership. To learn more about the MAC, click here.


Regional Councils

SHRM-affiliated chapters and state councils are divided geographically into seven regions. Each of the regions has a council composed of the state council directors in each of the five domestic regions and the chapter presidents in each of the island nation regions. Regional Councils provide opportunities for best practice sharing among and between the council members. In addition, regional councils:

  • Provide channels of communication on human resource management issues.
  • Encourage connections with business leaders and the general business community to advance the profession.
  • Play a key role in identifying and communicating emerging strategic issues.
  • Provide input to the SHRM Board of Directors.
  • Facilitate the achievement of SHRM's seven strategic objectives by providing state councils and chapters with guidance and assistance. To see a map of the regions, click here


    State Councils

    Each state and designated territory within the United States is governed by a state council, headed by a state council director who is automatically a member of one of the seven regional councils. State councils provide a structure for key volunteer leaders in the state to consult together on the affairs, activities, needs, and problems of the Society in the state (or territory) and to adopt programs to promote the progress and welfare of the Society as a whole, including providing channels of communication between chapters, state councils, and regional councils; services to members of the human resource management profession within the state, and leadership training at the state level. To learn more about State Councils, go to /chapters/councils.asp.


    Professional Chapters

    The Society has a growing network of more than 575 professional chapters and 400 student chapters across the United States. Professional chapter presidents are automatically a member of the applicable state council. Chapters provide:

    • A forum for the personal and professional development of its members.
    • A chance to develop leadership, managerial, public speaking, and group decision making skills.
    • An arena for the development of trust relationships where common problems can be discussed and deliberated.
    • An opportunity to focus on current human resource management issues of importance to chapter members.
    • Focus for legislative attention to state and national human resource management issues.
    • Valuable information-gathering and dissemination channels.
    • A pool of human resource management leaders for perpetuation of the professional association.
    • Serve as an important point of introducing and recruiting human resource management professionals into the national organization.
    • Serve as part of the two-way channel of communications between the national organization and the individual members.
    To learn more about Chapters, go to /chapters/.

    Student Chapters

    The SHRM student program was created in 1965 to promote mutually beneficial interaction between HRM students and practitioners. Membership offers students the opportunity to supplement their classroom education with real-world knowledge and hands-on experience.

    Since the first chapter was chartered in 1965, the student program has continued to grow. The SHRM student membership program now includes over 400 affiliated student chapters and more than 15,000 student members.

    To learn more about student chapters, go to /students/memberinfo.
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